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anotherboheminan:

Nous sommes dans la cuisine de Jenny Armit au Mexique.

anotherboheminan:

Nous sommes dans la cuisine de Jenny Armit au Mexique.

fleaingfrance:

FleaingFrance……the chairs that may have gotten away.  I hate it when I forget to go back and get a phone number! via fleaingfrance on instagram.  Follow for more French inspiration

fleaingfrance:

FleaingFrance……the chairs that may have gotten away.  I hate it when I forget to go back and get a phone number! via fleaingfrance on instagram.  Follow for more French inspiration

thestylishacademic:

|| The Stylish Academic || From Dusty Old Textbooks to the New Vogue || 

thestylishacademic:

|| The Stylish Academic || From Dusty Old Textbooks to the New Vogue || 

decordesignreview:

blue and white tile ~ Anouska Hempel home

decordesignreview:

blue and white tile ~ Anouska Hempel home

battemberg:

Comparte via Facetune.

battemberg:

Comparte via Facetune.

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
After yesterday, I figured I’d better reassure you that—really—some cat art isn’t unbearably silly.
This, for example, is Giuseppe Maria Crespi’s The Kitchenmaid, from the early 18th century.
According to the Getty, “Crespi’s work reflects his sincerity, tenderness, and keen observation of nature, transformed by startling light effects and thick, fluid application of paint.”
The glowing brilliance of the kitchenmaid herself and the soft little cat on the chair uphold the Getty’s claim.
There’s something kind of unusual about the style, though.
And indeed, The Encyclopædia Britannica writes that Crespi was an “Italian Baroque painter who broke dramatically with the formal academic tradition to achieve a direct and immediate approach to his subject matter that was unparalleled at the time.”
Never has a rebel looked so endearingly quaint.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

After yesterday, I figured I’d better reassure you that—really—some cat art isn’t unbearably silly.

This, for example, is Giuseppe Maria Crespi’s The Kitchenmaid, from the early 18th century.

According to the Getty, “Crespi’s work reflects his sincerity, tenderness, and keen observation of nature, transformed by startling light effects and thick, fluid application of paint.”

The glowing brilliance of the kitchenmaid herself and the soft little cat on the chair uphold the Getty’s claim.

There’s something kind of unusual about the style, though.

And indeed, The Encyclopædia Britannica writes that Crespi was an “Italian Baroque painter who broke dramatically with the formal academic tradition to achieve a direct and immediate approach to his subject matter that was unparalleled at the time.”

Never has a rebel looked so endearingly quaint.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

jaded-mandarin:

Thomas Gainsborough. A Boy with a Cat, 1787.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

jaded-mandarin:

Thomas Gainsborough. A Boy with a Cat, 1787.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?